Calculating drag

I’d like to be able to calculate drag. Here is a lecture series on that:

Notice how the drag coefficient of a streamlined body is 0.04, versus 0.82 for a long cylinder.

I don’t think anyone is calculating drag manually anmore, especially for custom airfoils.
I’d say looking at drag polars and then simulating is the way to go.
@tallakt How do professionals estimate drag?

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Hehe. Im a software guy. In kitemill we use numerical calculation of lift and drag relative to airflow. There is a software called xfoil that does a decent job at it I believe. I have not been involved in this though

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Xfoil from Mark drela, original version up to something like 1980’s is still the best open tool available.
Also airfoil tool that compute many calculation performed on Xfoil is really useful.

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Btw: yes by pure luck I’m a paid professional in this business. That doesnt necessarily mean that I know a lot of stuff. I think the biggest differene between me now and me a while ago, before I started in my current job is that now I have seen Kitemills rig inflight many times. This has adjusted my views on what is important and not. But there has not been sudden insight dealt to me. Anyone could make a better guess than me in most issues AWE…

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4 posts were merged into an existing topic: Tip Speed Ratio

Intro to Reynolds number:

Demonstration:

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