Toward the worst AWES

On the paper it was not so good. But in fact it was so bad!
Conclusion: don’t mix soft and rigid wings, otherwise we get a wing that’s just capable of dancing rock-and-roll on a leg then the other.

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Thank you for sharing! We need more of those stories. :slight_smile:

Are the rigid wings even bridled?
I am keen to mix rigid and soft… in different layers of a daisy… rigid above driving soft below to maintain stack form

No, I hoped the kite pression on the supports of the rigid wings would be sufficient.
Even with a bridle on rigid wings, the features of rigid and soft wings are too different to allow a good flight cohesion. The higher density of rigid wings is also responsible for a destabilizing momentum effect.
R&D should be far more important to find an acceptable solution.

Bonkers
However I’m all for linking multiple kites together.
A single rigid span between two x single line soft kites could be interesting…
Or between 2 x two line kites rigged as single line kites with the outmost lines shortened… This way the soft material is always pulling tension into the whole form which may be enough (depending on weight and wind-speed) to maintain a workable rig.
e.g. the rigid material can hold it’s own span form while the soft tensile outer parts hold the line tension from the aerodynamic forces.

Just as crappy was the time I thought I could make an attempt at a single skin 2 line kite by just cutting holes into the bottom surface material of a good working ram air kite. doh
Just no control. The nose kept crumpling cord-wise toward the tail.

Here is a soft parachute kite between a single rigid spar with a wing in each end. But as there is rotation the parachute makes only drag.
I think your idea is different.

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Both soft and rigid wings are fantastic, but each has its preferred velocity range. Soft wing performance dominates at low velocity and rigid wing performance requires high velocity. The two kinds of wings can be combined optimally in an AWES by reserving the soft wing for pilot-lift to suspend a rigid wing for fast load-motion.

In the final analysis, scaling laws determine optimal wing basis. Most-probable global wind velocities (<600m altitude) are rather low constants, and too large and heavy a kite will just sit on the ground most of the time for lack of high wind. Low wing loading is favored for kites at all scales, for multiple reasons, but harder to achieve by rigid wings.

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Wish you had taped a video. Super curious how it flew. With more info we might provide better feedback. Thanks for sharing

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With about 20 m two lines, there was no take-off or/and the flight was about 1 second.
When I held it with about 2 m two lines, it went from one side to the other very quickly, being uncontrollable.
If the two rigid wings were connected it would be different.

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Way back when…
This video shows a disgustingly cheap & haphazard implementation of what can otherwise be a good design


This was one of the scariest AWES tests I’ve flown.
This calamity was a good early indicator that multiline and network formations have advantages when shit goes wrong. Bizarrely it keeps working and holds together.
A bit like me really…
I’m still completely skint but I make much better kites now.
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We attempted to mix rigid and soft and experienced what we affectionately refer to as “the angry chicken”. What a mess it was! Similar design to what Pierr eB has pictured above.

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So let us produce a collaboratively chicken-farm!

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